Hair Salon Business Ownership: Online Marketing That Draws Traffic

Online salon marketing can be used for hair salon business ownerships, nail salon business ownership as well as any beauty business ownership. One of the keys to staying in business is making sure you are using proven marketing strategies.

YouTube is a great low to no cost marketing strategy that can help any business get placed on the map and draw more traffic to their physical location as well as virtual location – website.

Cross Promoting and Collaborating with others in your industry can be beneficial. Check out below different ways you can cross promote your hair salon business.

1. Video Guest Promotions: You can use your skills and education as a hair salon business owner and cross promote using videos with a hair stylist. He or she could be featured in your online salon marketing video. Simply take clips or ask the creator to send you a video of them answering a specific question, showing a new technique or giving some good advice.

2. Video Teasers: You can use clips from a fellow collaborator highlighting whatever you all decide. This can work both ways. You can send them a clip of something or some topic you would like to promote as a teaser to get viewers interested and clicking for you.

3. Video Shout Outs: Owning a hair salon business involves more than just you operating the day-to-day of the salon. Being a hair salon business owner you have a responsibility to the hair and beauty community to stay on top of the latest trends and ideas. By researching prospective collaborators or cross promoting you can give a shout out to other YouTube channels and creators in your salon marketing videos. This builds goodwill, gives the audience more information and it helps to distinguish you as an expert in the industry – It lets people know that if you don’t have the answer, you know someone who does.

4. Tip: Remember you can use annotations and links in your description of the video. Make sure you place the link to your fellow collaborators channel in your description.

5. Click Like: Something as small as clicking like on others YouTube channel is a form of cross promotion. Your subscribers will be able to see your activity and see whose channel you like. You can also use this same concept by leaving a comment and marking the video as a favorite.

6. Subscriber Sharing: Using your hair salon business ownership status as influence when you subscribe to a fellow YouTubers channel that subscription is broadcast to your own subscribers or anyone visiting your channel page. This allows your viewing audience to indirectly see who you are promoting. This is a great way to help other salon owners, hair stylists, nail salons and beauty experts.

7. TIP: When you subscribe to someones channel send them a message asking them to subscribe to salon channel. Let them know that you would like to promote them and their business and you would appreciate the same. When they subscribe to you then you will show up and be indirectly promoted to their existing subscribers.

Exploring Business Ownership – Traditional Employment is Not Risk-Free (Part 4 of 7)

In previous articles we’ve talked about the personality types that have the best chance of business ownership success and helped you define your goals for wanting to be in business. Now we’ll explore how entrepreneurs, franchise owners, and employees generally think. Where will you find a match?

How You Think Vs Your Risk Tolerance

As I’ve shared previously, business success is far from guaranteed so it’s important that you assess your tolerance for risk before committing funds to any business venture. One very general way to assess your risk tolerance is by analyzing the way you think.

Generally speaking, there are three main ways to earn income in increasing order of personal risk; employment, franchise ownership, and entrepreneur business ownership. We’ll explore each to see which you identify best with.

The World of Employment

Employee think is:

I did what I was supposed (or told) to do and I can prove it.

If you’re most comfortable with a narrowly defined set of responsibilities, expect your desk (or tools or equipment) to be provided for you, want to call the IT department when your computer hangs up, crave regular working hours with paid vacation and holidays, and expect benefits paid by someone else, then you’ll probably be most comfortable in an employment situation.

When employment is a good fit you feel most comfortable when you do your part as a team member and leave the business consequences of your work assignment to others. If this describes you, take heart! There’s absolutely no shame in being an employee! In fact, most of the business world is made up of employees who willingly do their part and receive a fixed hourly or salary income in return.

Traditionally employment has also had the least amount of risk for loss of income, although that’s becoming less true. For several decades following World War II there was an unwritten social contract between large corporations (and even many smaller businesses) and their employees that went something like this:

If you come to work with us and work hard, then you are welcome to stay with our company as long as you like. We will retrain our loyal employees to take on new tasks and responsibilities because they are our most valuable asset. We will take care of you with good benefits and if you stay with us long enough we will also provide for your retirement.

Contrast that historic practice with the current social norm of viewing employees as a commodity to be hired when needed and laid off when not.

Risk Assessment

Employment and depending on others for income who may not have your best personal or career interests at heart carries the least risk of the three income earning options. But it’s not risk-free and is far more risky now than it used to be. Let me suggest the book The Disposable American: Layoffs and Their Consequences, by Louis Uchitelle, for further reading (I have no financial interest in this book).

Didn’t identify with “employee think?” Check out part 5 where we’ll explore how franchise owners think.

Exploring Business Ownership – Putting it All Together (part 7 of 7)

We’ve explored the options for earning income in this 7 part series, ranging from the world of employment to full entrepreneurial business ownership. We’ve covered some basic concepts of what it means to be in business, the personality types that do well in this arena, and how to gauge your tolerance for the risks involved.

If, after absorbing all this knowledge, you decide you’re still interested in business ownership, then you’ll want to know how you can stack the odds of being successful in your favor, and when in life or an economic cycle is the best time to start or buy one.

When Is the Best Time to Start or Buy a Business?

Frankly speaking, there’s never a best time in life to get into business. In fact, there’s almost never a “good” time to get into business at all, because there’s always a good reason not to.

Reasons not to include, “We just got married and we’re saving for a house.” “We’re expecting our first child and we’re saving for that event.” “We’ve just started a college savings account for the kids.” “We’re pregnant (again).” “We just bought a bigger house and it’s put a big strain on our budget.” “The economy is up, so my job is secure.” “The economy is down and we have to watch our expenses ‘just in case’.” “I just got laid off, so we’re really watching our budget.” “I just got hired, so we have to rebuild our savings.” “We have kids in college and tuition is due.” “Our parents are in failing health and we’re contributing to their financial upkeep.” “Retirement is just around the corner and we’re making maximum contributions to our.401(k).” And finally, “We’re retired.”

So, there’s never a best time in life to get into business for yourself. If you’ve decided that your risk temperament is right for some type of business ownership and you have the motivation to take the plunge, then at some point you just have to take the bull by the horns and do it.

Why Businesses Succeed

Remember that you must have the basic ingredients in place to be a successful owner, regardless of your degree of risk tolerance or the business model you operate; self-motivation, the willingness to ask for help, a clear understanding of what you want to achieve, and the emotional ability to change when the business or market needs require it.

Of all the attributes I’ve listed, the willingness to ask for help, insight, advice, and counsel at every opportunity is the single most important thing you can do. Don’t try to go it alone; there’s simply too much at stake.

Successful business owners have a drive to succeed, know that they don’t have to singlehandedly blaze their own trail, recognize what’s at stake if their business fails, and realize that every great team and performer has a skilled coach helping them.

Eric Schmidt shared in the July 6, 2009, issue of Fortune Magazine that the best piece of advice he ever received was to hire a coach. And frankly, if the chairman and CEO of Google needs a coach, then you need one, too.

Why? Good business coaches give a 3rd party look at an issue and how you’re handling it, they discuss alternative approaches or options with you that may be more effective, and they encourage you to change habits or take risks that you wouldn’t be prepared to do on your own. They are a sounding board; they become a trustworthy confidant who has your best interest at heart. Finally, a good business coach will help you break through to achieve what you couldn’t on your own.

Then, successful business owners will grab the bull by the horns and implement the advice they’ve received. And if execution is not their strong suit, they’ll ask for help in learning how.

Wrapping Up

Business ownership is a high risk venture that can have great rewards. I hope what I’ve shared here has given you some personal and professional insight as you explore the world of business ownership. I’d enjoy your feedback on whether this series has helped you in your decision making process. If you decide to go forward, I’ll look forward to hearing how you’re doing. I wish you the very best of success.

Exploring Business Ownership – Franchises, a Controlled Way to Own a Business (Part 5 of 7)

In part 4 we began a discussion on how to assess your risk tolerance for business ownership by analyzing the way you think. I covered the 3 main ways to earn income, outlined the risks associated with employment, and how employees typically think. If you didn’t identify with “employee think” then maybe you’ll identify with franchise ownership.

Franchise Ownership

Franchise owner think is:

I can run the systems, methods, and procedures that are already defined and documented. If you’ll show me how, I can pull the right levers and push the right buttons to make the business work.

If you’ve had middle management experience or if you’re a “systems” kind of person, if you like a broader scope of responsibility while staying within certain rules, if you can solve big picture problems but enjoy support when you’re having a tough go of it, if you want more personal freedom than being trapped 9 to 5 in an office cube, and if you want to build equity in a business investment that you can eventually sell, then owning a franchised business model is worth looking into.

Most people think of restaurants when they think of the franchise industry. However, there are literally thousands of franchised business models available in the US in at least 50 different industries, although in my opinion probably only a few hundred are truly robust or mature enough to consider investing in.

When you buy into a franchised business model you license the right to operate a business, usually within a prescribed territory, using the franchise brand name and their products, services, and methods of operation. You basically operate a “clone” of what other franchisees are operating.

Presumably the products and services have been tested and perfected, target markets have already been defined, marketing campaigns have been developed, store designs have been created, and the necessary equipment has been specified. You essentially operate the business model in accordance with the methods and procedures prescribed by the franchisor. Some feel that it’s a controlled way of getting your feet wet in the business ownership world.

Risk Assessment

In my opinion investing in and operating a franchise is more risky than employment, but has less risk than an unsupported entrepreneur-owned business. The franchisor has a vested interest in helping you succeed in their business model because they get a royalty cut of your sales income stream.

However, it is certainly possible to fail in business owning a franchised business model. If you don’t follow their system, if you refuse to market your business, if their business model, product, or service simply doesn’t meet the needs of the market place, or for any of a number of other reasons, then you can loose your entire investment (just like entrepreneurial business ownership).

If your risk temperament seems to be right for the franchise area, then I highly recommend retaining an independent outside advisor to guide you through your initial investigation and evaluation of the thousands of concepts available. Like independent fee-for-service financial advisors, getting professional counsel to help you navigate through this area will be money well spent.

Did you identify with “franchise owner think?” If not, stay tuned. In part 6 we’ll explore how entrepreneurial business owners think.